May 28, 2015

Baseline Blvd by @imemi

5:01 pm in art,comics,zines dustin hostetler



“…a 64 page autobiographical story about grief, and about driving through rural Missouri.”

It’s pretty fantastic. Head on over to Emi Gennis’ website for more information.

May 24, 2015

adam griffiths, cartoonist

8:27 pm in art,cartoons,comics dustin hostetler


May 22, 2015

Help fund Ocular Anecdotes No.2 (published by @ottopressUK) on @kickstarter!

5:17 pm in art,books,comics,design,zines dustin hostetler




May 21, 2015

Faesthetic # 14 in collaboration with @ToledoMuseum. Cover art by @heyitsmatthew

7:33 pm in art,art events,comics,design,faesthetic,zines dustin hostetler


Collectable and affordable, Faesthetic is a collection of art & oddities from around the world. Part comic book & part zine, Faesthetic is a great place to discover new art & ideas.

Issue #14 showcases 128 pages of original “Play Time” themed art from over 45 artists. Featuring cover art by Matthew Hoffman, documentation of Cody Hudson‘s Artist-in-Residence at Soho House Chicago and a scratch & sniff comic strip by Jason Polan.

This limited edition issue is also the official catalog for the Toledo Museum of Art‘s 2015 Spring / Summer “Play Time” themed show.

Featuring in order of appearance:
Stephen Eichhorn, Sarah Bernhard, Dan Matutina, Sarah Haug, Matthew Daniel Swan, Keith Greiman, Braulio Amado, Friends With You, Sally Thurer, Daniel Guerrero Fernández, Prate™,Torie Leigh, Andrew Abbott, Mister Phil, Amir Fallah, Jon Contino, JK5, Magic Sweater, Chad Kouri, Dieter Van der Ougstraete, Justin Wallis, Paul Octavious, Fionn McCabe, Bijan Berahimi,Ted Parker, Denis Carrier, Dark Igloo, Cody Hudson, Gluekit, Zansky, Ricardo Rodriguez,Michelle Duni, Dalek, Matt Huynha, Gavin Edwards, Chuck Anderson, Margherita Urbani, Karen Barbour, Adam Batchelor, Julian Glander, Kyle Jorgensen, Lucas Noguera, Jon Fox, Jason Polan& Jose Mertz.

Faesthetic #14 is only $10 + S&H. Head on over to for sample images and a link to order. Extremely limited numbers available for purchase!

December 8, 2014

Talking Magpie Magpie with @MattHuynh

11:44 pm in art,comics,conversations dustin hostetler

Magpie Magpie is a new, wonderfully illustrated comic book that just pulls you in. While the web version of the book offers a great experience, it’s highly recommended that you pick up a physical copy.

I had the opportunity to ask creator Matt Huynh a little bit about his process…

TF: The book has a very cinematic flow. There is such a fluid movement to the panels and illustrations. Even ending with the flipbook sequence of the flying bird… when you close your eyes and retell the story, do you see it animated?

MH: ‘Magpie, Magpie’ is peculiarly a comic book experience. I was careful to customise the online and print presentation of the comic to showcase each medium’s unique characteristics. I used the book’s properties as a physical object to influence the comic’s rhythm and pacing, whether by exploiting a reader’s page turn, peripheral vision across spreads, or the cloudiness of the paper stock hinting of things to come. The concluding flipbook is another way of compelling the reader to experience the comic through the unique properties of the paperback – to move the hand from turning leafs to flipping through the stacked pages. I’m conscious about making comics that are an engaged act of life itself, rather than a passive discourse, commentary, description or argument on a part of life.

The flipbook appears as a looping animation in the online presentation, and the book compels readers who have been moving at the pace of a page turn to go back and flip through the sequence repeatedly once they’ve realised what’s unfolding in the final half of the book. It’s hinted at with the fore-edge equal parts black and white in an allusion to the magpie of the title. It felt almost inevitable that this gothic story – where the haunted are animated by spasming impulse and trapped in a purgatory of repeated memories and actions – would end with a tirelessly, looping animation.

TF: Through certain sequences, the reader really gets a sense of losing their mind and falling into insanity. It’s very effective and I’m curious where you drew your inspiration for that.

MH: This comic is obsessed abandonment and missing or being missing. There are the kidnappers on the run in a strange land, submitting to the violent storm bearing down on them, the daughter lost and alone in the desolate outback landscape, and a ghostly host waiting eternally for the return of his long departed lover. The comic is one specific emotional refrain that is hit and left ringing again and again.

The comic has at its centre a man who doesn’t realise he is dead, and consequently his earnest acts of chivalry become oppressive, unwanted expressions inflicted upon all those he mistakes as his lover and from living trapped a time that’s long gone. This hole in objective experience tangled with memory and emotion is something that I hope the viewer feels just as disorientated and confused about.

My last comic was about refugees and asylum seekers waiting in a detention centre for their fate to be decided, and with no sign of returning home – a torturous waiting and mystery. I’m occupied with this as the child of refugees. Mystery occupies my practice an artist staying attentive and open in courting my muse. It also is in the everyday struggle with emotional capacity and Keat’s negative capability, occupying uncertainty and life filled with chance and chaos without grasping for reason.

I’m certainly conscious of making work that can be experienced as sensually as pouring wine on your tongue or letting music vibrate in your ear. Something that suffers for reaching for sense and a simplistic rational line through the book, and benefits instead from letting the work wash over. Disorientating the reader, even if only from the counterintuitive line weights, is within the greater aspiration for work that’s an act of life itself rather than mere commentary from the sidelines.

TF: While the book is “only” black and white, your use of depth and tone in shading really drew me in. I’m wondering what your thought process was in deciding to commit to one color for this book, when of course you could have easily told this story with a broader color palette.

MH: Comic’s constraints demand an economy of words in balloons, sharing the same physical space as the characters in any framed moment. There’s a poetic reduction of detail, with a few marks becoming a smiling face. Working with black and white likewise allows for the Japanese idea of ‘Ma’, or the space consciously allowed for our experiences. We might recognise in this restraint that from all the richness flooding us at any given moment, only very minor details survive the trip through our conscious senses to reach our awareness, stay in our memories, and are constantly revised in our retelling.

TF: For general interest, what contemporary (and dead???) artists do you look to for inspiration? Anyone my readers should know about?

MH: My greatest influences are the artist friends I happen to keep close to me as guides and mentors and creative juggernauts, because they are such a presence in my life. They’re most in my life and whose inspiration lights a constant fire under me. I love listening to High Highs, Jolie Holland, Buck Meek and Adrianne Lenker, Appleonia, Margaret Glaspy, Black Ryder, Sui Zhen, Adam Brisbin, Shy Hunters, Invisible Familiars. I read Julie Koh, and I love anything by Marilynne Robinson. In comics it’s Paul Pope, Molly Crabapple, Farel Dalrymple, Eddie Campbell, Katie Parrish, Aidan Koch, Conor Willumsen, Sam Wallman, Pat Grant, Ben Hutchings, Jillian Tamaki, and I love Lorenzo Mattotti and Marjane Satrapi too. In illustration, it’s about James Victore, James Jirat Patradoon, webuyyourkids, Kate Banazi, Joana Avillez, Wesley Allsbrook.

More at &

ATTN CHICAGO! 6Pack Stories: Festus Rotgut via @arcadebrewery featuring @jasonaaron & @tonymoore

11:06 pm in art events,chicago,comics,product dustin hostetler

I don’t normally pass along press releases, but this is pretty fucking cool:

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Chicago craft brewery, Arcade Brewery, announced today it will release it’s first volume of “6­Pack Stories” on new comic day, Wednesday December 10th. Festus Rotgut: Zombie Cowboy is a western zombie comic written by Jason Aaron (Thor / Southern Bastards) and illustrated by Tony Moore (The Walking Dead / Fear Agent) across six bottles of Black Wheat Ale.

Arcade co­founder Lance Curran said the idea was to tell a story first and then brew a beer to match the story. Co­founder Chris Tourre brewed that beer and says he chose a dark wheat ale because it seemed to fit perfectly with the tale of Festus Rotgut.

“Since there are zombies, I immediately thought something dark,” said Tourre. “Driving a heard of cattle across the dusty landscape also made me immediately go to a dry wheat beer.”

Tourre says he used some specialty roasts to create marshmallow and caramel flavors. He dry hopped the beer too, which Tourre says gives it a spicy finish.

6­Pack Stories creates a unique experience for the craft beer and comic book lover. A rarity in beer and story telling, 6­Pack Stories will become an instant collector’s item and a must­have gift for any beer­drinking comic fan.

Festus Rotgut is a limited release and will be available in Chicago area bottle shops. See a map of locations at, or you can buy it online at West Lakeview Liquors, The Beer Temple, and Binny’s Beverage Depot.

Arcade Brewery will host tastings of Festus Rotgut on Wednesday at the following Chicago locations: Kimbark Beverage, Binnys Lincoln Park, Bottles & Cans, and West Lakeview Liquors. Please follow Arcade Brewery on Twitter and Facebook for further info.

Arcade Brewery is a Chicago ­based craft brewery dedicated to creating delicious craft beer inspired by art and community.

November 17, 2014

.@AminoAcidBoy, and the work of Diego Lazzarin

5:58 pm in art,books,comics dustin hostetler


Diego is making a comic book, and he’s sharing his progress on tumblr! It’s intense, colorful and full of great detail. I can’t wait to see the finished piece!

It’s a story about an alien boy sent on Earth by his Lord to accomplish an explorative mission.

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